Traditional Wedding Vows Explained

Traditional Wedding Vows Explained

traditional wedding vows explained

Traditional Wedding Vows Explained

Spot the difference between the females wording and the male’s wording:-

Traditional Wedding Vows Explained

“I Frieda take thee George to be my lawful wedded husband to have and to hold from this day forward, for better or for worse, for richer, or for poorer, in sickness and in health, to love, cherish and obey thee; and I promise to be faithful to thee until death do us part”.

“I George take thee Frieda to be my lawful wedded wife to have and to hold from this day forward, for better or for worse, for richer, or for poorer, in sickness and in health, to love and cherish thee; and promise to be faithful to thee until death do us part”.

Yes you got it – the word ‘obey’ is not in the husband’s words as traditionally men, as the bread winner of the home were considered the boss and therefore what the boss says goes. Being the breadwinner literally meant that they were the member of the household who earns all of the income therefore, making him the head of the household who was to be obeyed.

I knew you would like that, men as you would probably like to go back there and women because you are so glad we have made great progress in getting away from such rules.

Now let us disect this traditional vow and examine what exactly we were saying to our future husbands:-

“I Frieda take thee George to be my lawful wedded husband (In premodern times a husband was supposed to protect and support not only his wife and children, but servants and animals of his domain, and as a father was awarded with much authority), to have and to hold from this day forward (what this means for the wife is that as her husband is the authority of the household that she must give him sex whenever he wants it), for better or for worse, for richer, or for poorer (as the authority figure of the household no matter whether he gambles his money, spends it wisely or goes from being rich to being poor you as the wife must stand by your man), in sickness and in health, to love, cherish and obey thee (no matter what status befells your loving husband you are obliged to unconditiaonlly love and obey your darling husband); and I promise to be faithful to thee until death do us part (and of course you are not allowed to stray)”.

“I George take thee Frieda to be my lawful wedded wife (someone who is not legally independent but relies on me as the husband) to have and to hold (as the wife you must consummate our marriage as often as your husband desires) from this day forward, for better or for worse, for richer, or for poorer (no matter what my status you must remain my wife), in sickness and in health (when I am ill you must look after me), to love and cherish thee (sure I will love you no matter what); and promise to be faithful to thee until death do us part” (and he promises to be faithful to himself until he dies).

Traditionally that is how it was, as women were regarded as second class citizens with no rights and their role in life, once married was to look after their husband’s every wish and desire.

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